Sewing With Kids: Easy Potholder

Do you like my old french enamel ware match holder? Allumettes.
A friend of mine was having a barbecue this weekend. I wanted to bring her a little gift but as usual, I hadn’t planned anything, it was 4 o’clock and I didn’t have time to buy something. So I made her a potholder!
I had to figure out the quickest one I could make in a hurry.
I took photos of the process and am sharing my tutorial with you.
If you are new to sewing or trying to teach your kids to sew, this is the perfect project.
The whole project is just a series of straight sewn lines. 
Since this is such a simple project I am teaching my daughter with this tutorial. 
Tutorial:
1. Cut two fabric square pieces 10 inches by 10 inches.
2. Cut two or three batting pieces depending on their thickness , 10 inches by 10 inches. My batting was very thin so I used 3 pieces.
3. Cut one strap 10 inches by 2 1/2 inches.
4. Fold the strap lengthwise. Sew the strap together lengthwise with a 3/8 inch seam allowance.
4. Take a safety pin , attach it to the end of the strap an pull the strap right side out.
5. Iron the strap.
6. Attach the batting pieces to the WRONG side of one of the fabric pieces.
7. Take the strap and lay it on the RIGHT side of the fabric piece like above.
8. Now lay the other piece of fabric on top of the fabric piece with the strap on it.
9. Pin all the layers together.
10. Sew all of the layers together with a 3/8 inch seam allowance. Leave a 3 inch opening on one of the sides. Sew straight off each side. 
11. Trim the corner edges of the potholder.
13. Pull the potholder through the gap you left unsewn. Use a point turner or the edges of your scissors to pop out the corners of the potholder.
14. Iron the potholder flat, ironing the little gap closed.
15. Topstitch around the potholder edges with a1/4 inch seam allowance, sewing the gap shut.
15. Draw straight lines in both directions on the potholder with chalk or water soluble marker. Make them evenly spaced, about 2 inches apart. Stitch on the lines, quilting the potholder.
16. Done!


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-McKenzie

Comments

  1. Mel Maj says

    A great basic potholder to make, yout tute is great- easy to follow. Thanks for sharing this, will give it a go:)

  2. Amy says

    Thank you! I just signed up for a potholder swap (as a VERY newbie sewer) and this will be perfect!

  3. says

    I am also super new to sewing and making this pot holder was a breeze and also a great way introduce myself to my very first sewing machine. I loved this one because there was no bias tape or ribbon involved. The only variations on mine were that I used a dish towel as my “back” and insul-bright in place of regular batting. I need lots more practice, but I have my first little project complete. **Note to self: no matter how thick the layers, don’t forget to put down the presser foot** hahaha 😛

  4. says

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  5. Heather says

    I love this pattern. Thank you! I have been making some of these for Christmas. Has anyone had issues when you quilt the pot holder and the material bunches up when you get to the end of the row? It is almost like the material gets pushed forward when I start and then by the end there is extra. It is not awful but certainly takes away from a polished look. I am a beginner sewer so I might be doing something wrong. I tried to to lengthen the stitch and loosen the tension and both did not work. Thanks ahead of time for any thoughts!

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